Last goodbyes for Mohsin Mohsin Awan’s The Gardens Cricket Club teammates pay their final respects at a ceremony at Tuxford Park in Shortland on Friday. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers
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Uzair Khan lights candles for a shrine dedicated to Mohsin Awan on the pitch at Tuxford Park. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Uzair Khan carrying photos of Mohsin Awan for a shrine on the pitch at Tuxford Park. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Uzair Khanholds holds his hand to photographs of Mohsin Awan. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

An emotional friend of Mohsin Awan at a tribute to the 23-year-old on Friday. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

The Gardens Cricket Club secretary Paul Smith with the ball from Mohsin Awan’s final match. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Friends and teammates gather around a tribute to Mohsin Awan on Friday. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Teammates gather for a final farewell to Mohsin Awan on Friday. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Abdul Awan, centre, in blue, at a farewell to his cousin. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

A teammate makes the tribute to Mohsin Awan. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

An emotional Abdul Awan on Friday. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Mohsin Awan’s teammates gather to say their goodbyes. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

The Gardens Cricket Club secretary Paul Smith delivers a speech. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Abdul Awan makes a speech on Friday. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Gardens Cricket Club players sign a jersey for Mohsin Awan’s family. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Mohsin Awan’s tribute on Friday at Shortland. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Mohsin Awan’s bat with the score sheet and ball from his final match. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Mohsin Awan’s teammates and friends say a prayer on Friday. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

TweetFacebook Mohsin Awan farewelledPlayers from The Gardens Cricket Club farewell Mohsin Awan. Pictures: Max Mason-HubersAS family and friendsof tragic Nobbys drowning victim Mohsin Awan said their final goodbyes on Friday, the sun broke through cloud cover to shine brightly before leaving once more.

Moments earlier, Paul Smith, the secretary of The Gardens Cricket Club, led an emotionaltribute in front of Mr Awan’s grief-stricken teammates, and said the much-loved University of Newcastle international student“put his heart and soul into everything” and embraced life.

“A famous cricketer once said it’s not the cricketer in the man that counts …it’s the man inside the cricketer,” Mr Smith said.

“It’s the sort of person we are that matters in the long run and is remembered.

“On that account, Mohsin was a person who exemplified all that I would ever want to be as a person.

“He was joyful, he celebrated life … [he was]excited at opportunities and someone who put his heart and soul into everything.”

Mr Awan’s family in Pakistan was represented by cousin Abdul Awan, of Melbourne, who read a statement thankingthepublic for its sympathy and support, as well as emergency services for their efforts.

“Mohsin was a very fun-loving person, he was open-minded and understanding, he was a young man with so much to offer,” Abdul Awan said.

“This incident was a tragedy, it meant Mohsin lost his life. Our family are now without an important and vibrant member.”

Mohsin Awan’s bat with the score sheet and ball from his final match. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

The 23-year-old was swept from Nobbys Beach on Sunday by a large wave that dragged both Mr Awan and friend Mohsin Javed into a rip. Only Mr Javed was able to be pulled to safety by beachgoers.

Mohsin Awan, 23, was swept from Nobbys Beach in rough surf. Picture: Supplied

Emergency services scoured the water for three days before Mr Awan’s lifeless bodywas found aboutone kilometre from Newcastle Beach on Wednesday morning.

An emotional Malik Shahid, the cricket team’s captain, who was with Mr Awan the night he went missing in the surf, said the city’s Pakistani community was still in deep shock and yet to come to terms with the tragedy.

“This guy who left us, he was full of life, there’s no words to describe his personality,” Mr Shadid said. “I’ve never seen such a wonderful, full of life guy. I still can’t believe he’s not with us anymore.”

Teammates signed a Gardens jersey, while the number 45 –signifying 45 runs not out –his last score – was painted on the groundsof Tuxford Park in Shortland.

Mr Awan’s bat andjersey will be sent back to Pakistan with the cricket ball and score sheet from his final match.

Mr Awan had only lived in Australia for six months.His funeral will take place in Pakistan.

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James CummingsRandwick trainer James Cummings has described promising two-year-old filly Whispered Secret, favourite for Saturday’s 1350-metre maiden handicap at Newcastle, as a “work in progress”.
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Saturday’s meeting was scheduled for the Beaumont track but has moved to thecourse proper, with the rail seven metres out. Race times stay the same but race one shifts from 2200m to 2300m and races three and five grow from1150m to 1200m.

Whispered Secret, daughter of top sire High Chaparral, has had only two starts.

James Cummings

She was slowly away and raced keenly early before a creditable third, two lengths behind Falconic, on debut at Rosehill on Christmas eve.

She resumed after a 77-day break in an 1150mtwo-year-old event on a heavy Beaumont track and was in midfield until the home straight.

She was eased across the heels at the 350mmark but wanted to lay in badly behind other horses and, when she finally consented to go straight, she flashed home, beaten only 1¼ lengths. She will appreciate the extra 200mtrip on Saturday.

“This filly is very talented but is a work in progress,” Cummings said after acceptances on Thursday.

“She can do plenty wrong, as she did in her last start on the Beaumont track.

“She looked the winner in the straight then wanted to run in for a period, and that cost her the race. She sprouted wings in the last 100m.

“She is bred to run further, and the 1350m on Saturday is what she needs at this stage.

“Sheis only a two-year-old in an open maiden against older horses, but that doesn’t concern me as they are only maidens. I am just a bit sceptical of her racing manners.”

Newcastle trainer Kris Lees decided on Friday to start his three Newcastle acceptors despite the rain.

His Provincial Championships qualifierPrincess Posh and former New Zealand filly Rose Carolina will clash in the 1200mClass 2 Handicap.Tawfiq Boy will run in the 1200mClass 2 Handicap.

Princess Posh was also entered for a race at Muswellbrook’s Country Championships Wildcard meeting on Sunday, which has been moved to Scone.

“The filly needs to run at the weekend as she needs the hitout for the Provincial final,” Lees said.

“Tawfiq Boy will run at Newcastle. It is a good field, but he has a chance.”

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Images by James Woodford show a stand of fungi at Meringo, south of Moruya on the NSW South Coast. The dog’s name is Ringo, the person is nature film maker, Stuart Cohen. mushrooms Photo: James WoodfordMarch has not just been great weather for ducks; it’s also been a boon for mushroom pickers.
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Sydney has clocked up rain on all but four days this month. With showers a good chance for the remaining days of March, the city could match the record of 26 rainy March days set in 1870; so far, there have been 20.

Rainfall totals are already above 280 millimetres – or more than double the average – making it Sydney’s wettest March in 33 years, the Bureau of Meteorology says.

Saturday is likely to bring “just fleeting showers, generally in the afternoon”, Graeme Brittain, a meteorologist with Weatherzone, said.

Sunday will be another cloudy day, with a low chance of a storm teaming up with more showers.

But for mushroom hunters and those generally entranced by things fungal, the past few weeks have been bountiful.

Many mushroom species need four days of rain to get the signal “that it’s time to start spreading the spore”, resulting in the fruity stems pushing their way up, said Ray Kearney, a retired Sydney University professor and chairman of the Sydney Fungal Studies Group.

The emergence of different mushroom species starts from early autumn and lasts right through winter.

The many varieties – numbering in their thousands in Australia – are highly dependent on temperature and rain, he said.

Some species, though, should be admired at a distance given their spores can trigger allergies if inhaled. These include the common shell-shaped schizophyllum mushrooms found growing on tree trunks.

“People should not go out and pick mushrooms to eat unless they are absolutely sure of the species,” Professor Kearney said.

“There are lookalikes [to some edible species] and some are highly toxic.

The saffron milk cap (Lactarius deliciosus) is one introduced species that is edible – and now being picked with abandon in pine forests near Sydney.

“Stems have a distinctive pattern of darker orange blotches, [and] when cut, the gills exude a carrot-coloured milky juice,” Professor Kearney said. “When bruised or old, the surface becomes green.”

Also common among the pine rows are the fly agaric mushrooms (known scientifically as Amanita muscaria). These resemble those found in fairy tale picture books with their bright red cap and white flakes – but are poisonous.

Along with the beauty, fungal species play a rich and extensive role in ecosystems, with all orchid species dependent on them, Professor Kearney said.

One orchid species even mimics the odour of mushrooms to lure fungi gnats to help it pollinate.

While ample rain helps trigger the abundance of mushrooms, too much will leave many waterlogged.

On that score, there is some better news ahead. The arrival of a cold front by late next week should help budge the persistent onshore winds that have fostered the persistent showers, Mr Brittain said.

Sydney should then enjoy fresher, less humid conditions with clearer skies – but temperatures should start to feel a bit more autumnal.

Weatherzone is owned by Fairfax Media, publisher of this website.

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Testers Hollow after the January 2016 storm.Update:
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Maitland MP Jenny Aitchison will write to new Roads Minister Melinda Pavey in a bid to enact“evidence-based thinking” over Testers Hollow.

She said an email chain revealed through freedom of information laws, which was obtained by the NSW Labor Party and passed on to Fairfax Media, showed the government was not serious about fixing the flood-prone stretch.

“My concern is that the spin was giving the minister a way out and a way they could spin it to the community,” Ms Aitchison said.

“Bureaucrats wouldn’t be writing emails like that unless they felt that was the perspective of the minister.

“Duncan Gay never encouraged anything to happen.”

Ms Aitchison said the population increase in housing estates at Gillieston Heights was one of many reasons why the stretch should be fixed.

“Since the government has been elected there has been a massive increase in the population in that area and people are still building there–it’s beyond a joke now,” she said.

“It’s commuter time, people who use the road to get to work are spending more time in their cars when its flooded.”

Ms Aitchison believes the government doesn’t want to fix the problem until a member of their party is the local MP.

She will write to Ms Pavey and urge her to fix the problem.

“Anytime we get anything done for Maitland it always comes from Sydney–they don’t understand what the issue is here,” Ms Aitchison said.

Earlier report:

The state road authority discussed stalling a flood fix forTesters Hollow less than a year ago, an email shows.

Government ‘spins’ Testers action OVERDUE: Great-granddaughter of William Tester June Hirst believes the flooding problem should have been fixed long ago. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

FRUSTRATION: Cliftleigh resident Sonia Warby and daughter Kirra-lea after the January 2016 storm closed Testers Hollow for almost five days.

Testers Hollow was blocked for almost five days in January 2016. Picture: Nick Bielby

Testers Hollow was blocked for almost five days in January 2016. Picture: Nick Bielby

Testers Hollow was closed from April 21 to May 7, 2015 due to flooding. Photo: Sage Swinton

Testers Hollow was closed from April 21 to May 7, 2015 due to flooding. Photo: Sage Swinton

Cars contend with flood waters as Testers Hollow rises during the April storm. Photo: Sonia Warby.

Boat crews help send supplies to Gillieston Heights, which was cut off by floodwater on both sides in April 2015. Photo: Sonia Warby.

Boat crews help send supplies to Gillieston Heights, which was cut off by floodwater on both sides in April 2015. Photo: Sonia Warby.

Testers Hollow was closed from April 21 to May 7, 2015 due to flooding. Photo: Sonia Warby.

Testers Hollow was closed from April 21 to May 7, 2015 due to flooding. Photo: Sonia Warby.

Boat crews help send supplies to Gillieston Heights, which was cut off by floodwater on both sides in April 2015. Photo: Sonia Warby.

Testers Hollow was closed from April 21 to May 7, 2015 due to flooding. Photo: Sonia Warby.

A bus trapped in floodwater at Testers Hollow in 1929.

A bus trapped in floodwater at Testers Hollow in 1929.

Passengers from the stranded bus were rowed to dry land.

Testers Hollow

East Maitland, across from golf course. Picture by Charles Willacy

Morpeth. Picture by Charles Willacy

No through road, Morpeth. Picture by Charles Willacy

Morpeth park. Picture by Charles Willacy

Horseshoe Bend, Maitland. Picture by Charles Willacy

Morpeth. Picture by Charles Willacy

East Maitland. Picture by Charles Willacy

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OVERWHELMING: How do you make peace with a busy life?
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It’s 3am.

I’m wide awake, my chest hurts and I’m gasping for air.

A thousand thoughts are racing through my mind and soon my head will surely explode.

It’s the overwhelm; the obvious conclusion of a prolonged period of time juggling too many balls across family, work, philanthropic and social commitments.

Just a few days before I’d smugly congratulated myself on reaching the nirvana of “having it all”.

The flourishing career, the model children and partner, the life/work balance so many people (women in particular) insist is unachievable – “you can have it all, just not all at the one time”.

I got out a pad of paper and, in the darkness, starting writing down the myriad tasks, reminders, and ideas that were causing this unshakeable overwhelm.

RSVP for that dinner, follow up that email, start a pack list for my May holiday … on and on it went, until finally I sunk back into a deep sleep.

Next day I’m in solution mode.

How can I stop this from happening again, short of knocking myself out with a Valium at bed time?

I’m already loading up on B12 and antioxidants in the morning and magnesium at night.

I’m following a nutrient dense diet.

I have a supportive tribe of friends and family, a clear plan for achieving my work goals and planned leave just a short stretch away.

Then it hit me. I do have it all, I just didn’t have it all yesterday.

So I made peace with the busyness of life.

I gave myself permission to be overwhelmed, to scramble in the dark for a few hours.

And then the sun came up.

A brand new day of having it all.

Belinda Smith is a business leader and chair of Got Your Back SistaMore local business stories:theherald南京夜网419论坛/news/business/

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