Health authorities have urged the public to be on alert for measles symptoms after two children and a young woman contracted the highly infectious disease and spent time in western Sydney.
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The two children, a boy and a girl, and woman in her twenties had not been vaccinated against the measles, and were infectious while visiting several public places in Auburn and Chester Hill between March 16 and 23, NSW Health advised on Friday.

They visited: NAS Medical Centre, Auburn, on March 19 and 22Cheso Medical Centre, Chester Hill, on March 20Rawson Street Medical Centre, Auburn, on March 21Auburn Hospital Emergency Department on March 23

The latest three confirmed cases bring the total number of measles infections in NSW to 11 for 2017, eight of which were acquired overseas.

It is likely the two children and woman contracted the disease from another recently reported case, but this has not been confirmed, NSW Health said.

The most recent case in Sydney involved an infectious person who travelled from Bangkok to Sydney on March 2.

“Measles is highly contagious and is spread in the air through coughing or sneezing by someone who is unwell with the disease,” Dr Shopna Bag, Manager of Communicable Diseases at Western Sydney Public Health Unit.

Symptoms of measles include fever, sore eyes and a cough followed three or four days later by a red, blotchy rash spreading from the head and neck to the rest of the body.

Dr Bag said people with measles symptoms should seek medical advice as soon as possible, stay home from work or school, and limit other activities to avoid exposing other vulnerable people, such as infants, to the infection.

“Please call ahead to your doctor or emergency department so that arrangements can be made to keep you away from others to minimise the risk of spreading the infection,” she said.

Over the past five years, NSW Health said the number of people bringing measles into the state from outside the country had varied between two and 28 cases a year. The total number of reported cases of measles in NSW has ranged between nine and 174.

“Due to high immunisation rates and effective public health action the disease has been eliminated from Australia with limited onward spread from cases occurring in connection with importations,” Dr Vicky Sheppeard, director of communicable diseases for NSW Health said earlier this month.

The disease is no longer seasonal in Australia, NSW Health said.

Dr Bag said the latest cases yet again reinforced the importance of getting vaccinated to protect against the disease.

“Those people who have not received two doses of measles vaccine are at particular risk of contracting the disease and should be alert to symptoms.”

NSW Health said anyone born during or since 1966 should have two doses of vaccine at least four weeks apart. For young children, the vaccine is recommended at 12 months and 18 months of age.

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Penthouse in Sydney’s Opera Residences breaks Australian apartment record with $27 million saleDowner EDI buys Salteri family’s Tenix business for $300mLaying foundations of modern Australia
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Mystery has surrounded the “lower north shore” buyer who paid $27 million for a penthouse in the Opera Residences development since the deal was exchanged last November, but is only now revealed as wealthy businessman and philanthropist Robert Salteri and his wife Kelly.

The four-bedroom spread set a national record for the apartment market, topping the $26 million high set just days earlier by the sale of the adjoining penthouse in the same development at Circular Quay.

When it is completed in three years’ time the Salteri’s four-bedroom spread, set in the building’s prime north-facing position overlooking the Opera House, harbour and Botanic Gardens, is planned as the couple’s downsizer option from their waterfront home in Northbridge.

Salteri, a keen yachtie and former chief of Tenix, is the son of the late Carlo Salteri, who founded Transfield in 1956 with the Belgiorno-Nettis family before the company was split and the Salteri family took over the defence contracting operations into Tenix in 1997.

In 2014 the BRW Rich Families List ranked the Salteris as Australia’s ninth-richest family.

The sale price left many industry experts gobsmacked at the time not only for the bullish result but because the 280-square-metre apartment also equates to record-setting $96,400 per square metre.

The 104 apartments to be built in the old Coca-Cola Amatil building by China-based developers Macrolink and Landream sold out within two hours last November, totalling $500 million worth of real estate.

CBRE director Murray Wood negotiated the deal, but declined to comment for this story other than to say he could not confirm the identity of the buyer.

The Salteris are no stranger to setting property records. Robert Salteri’s former home also on the Northbridge waterfront set a suburb high in 2003 when he sold it for $7.13 million.

When they move to their new city pad the couple will be around the corner from the $9.85 million apartment of his brother Paul Salteri, which he purchased with his wife Sandra in 2011.

Paul and Sandra Salteri sold their Castlecrag trophy home, Penhallow, two years ago for $12.8 million. Fashion retailer picks up Southern Highland homestead

The house Boscobel in Sutton Forest. Photo: Supplied

Meanwhile, Brisbane-based fashion retailer Michael Josephson and his wife Melissa have bought the historic Boscobel homestead in the Southern Highlands for $4.3 million amid talk the couple plan to move there eventually.

The sale ends a two-year sales campaign for the 1870s-built mansion, which has been the home of recruitment industry boss Steven Hallis since 2007. It was most recently listed with Bill Carpenter, of WC Carpenter, who sold it.

Josephson is the co-founder with his brother Greg of the successful lifestyle fashion chain Universal Store, which has bucked the poor market performance of many fashion labels of the past year to report an 18 per cent rise in store sales in 2016.

The 48.5-hectare property in Sutton Forest was the long-time thoroughbred breeding stud of Richard Turnley, the former Thoroughbred Breeders of Australian president, who managed the stud before he bought it in 1979 for $180,000. Gas man selling Warrawee trophy

This nine-bedroom, 11-bathroom mansion in Warrawee is set to be sold for more than $15 million. Photo: Supplied

One of the Northern Territory’s richest men, oil and gas entrepreneur Jerry Ren is selling his trophy home on the upper north shore amid $15 million expectations.

The vast Warrawee estate of 6400 square metres is being marketed as Pantagruel, but was known as Bremon when it last sold for $11.5 million in late 2010, setting a then record for the upper north shore. Locals have long referred to it as the Chilton Hilton thanks to its nine bedrooms and 11 bathrooms.

Designed by architect Espie Dods, it was built in the 1980s for oil magnate Pat Burke, but sold incomplete in 1999 for $3 million to entrepreneur Simon and Brenda Tripp, who completed it. Stephen Sales, of Luschwitz, has the listing.

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Australian F1 Grand Prix 2017: Friday practice Daniel Ricciardo of Australia and Red Bull Racing prepares in the garage during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Mark Thompson/Getty Images
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Red Bull Racing Team Principal Christian Horner talks with Alain Prost, Special Advisor to Renault Sport F1 in the Paddock during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park. Photo: Mark Thompson/Getty Images

Daniel Ricciardo of Australia and Red Bull Racing arrives at the circuit and poses for a photo with fans during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Lewis Hamilton of Great Britain and Mercedes GP arrives at the circuit and signs autographs for fans during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Pascal Wehrlein of Germany and Sauber F1 arrives at the circuit and poses for a photo with a fan during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Kimi Raikkonen of Finland driving the (7) Scuderia Ferrari SF70H on track during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Robert Cianflone/Getty

Daniel Ricciardo of Australia and Red Bull Racing arrives at the circuit and poses for a photo with fans during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Max Verstappen of the Netherlands driving the (33) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB13 TAG Heuer on track during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017.. Photo: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Daniel Ricciardo of Australia driving the (3) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB13 TAG Heuer leaves the garage during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Mark Thompson/Getty Images

Fernando Alonso of Spain driving the (14) McLaren Honda Formula 1 Team McLaren MCL32 on track during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Max Verstappen of Netherlands and Red Bull Racing sits in his car in the garage during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Mark Thompson/Getty Images

Kimi Raikkonen of Finland driving the (7) Scuderia Ferrari SF70H on track during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Nico Hulkenberg of Germany driving the (27) Renault Sport Formula One Team Renault RS17 on track during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Former F1 World Drivers Champion Sir Jackie Stewart arrives at the circuit and signs autographs for fans during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Valtteri Bottas of Finland and Mercedes GP prepares for his first free practice session at a race weekend with the Mercedes GP team during practice for the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 24, 2017. Photo: Mark Thompson/Getty Images

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The Animal Tracks day trip focuses on local fruits, vegies and grubs. Photo: Ben Groundwater”How do you kill a crocodile?” someone asks, wide-eyed.
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Patsy shrugs. “It’s not that hard. You just shoot it.”

This is actually a moment of levity. Everyone has been so serious up until now, not sure how to approach Patsy, not sure if she’ll be comfortable answering certain questions, not sure if there’s a grisly, traditional way to dispose of a live croc that we don’t really want to know about.

How do you kill a crocodile? With a club? A spear?

So you have to laugh when you hear the answer: just shoot it. Not everything about Patsy’s way of life around here is the same as it was thousands of years ago. Some things have changed. But many things haven’t.

Patsy is one of the locals in this part of Kakadu National Park, a Gunavidji woman who moved down here from Arnhem Land. Much of her life is lived in the traditional way: she forages for food such as freshwater mussels, bush carrots and palm hearts, and she hunts animals like magpie geese and crocodiles.

There used to be a big croc that lived in the waterhole we’re standing next to, a five-metre monster that the local Aborigines had an unspoken peace treaty with. They didn’t disturb it; it didn’t disturb them. But then a dry spell hit and the water disappeared, so the big croc moved on. These days, smaller crocs keep turning up to stake their territory.

Patsy tending to the ground oven. Photo: Ben Groundwater

“Good eatin’,” Patsy says.

Patsy is our tour guide today. We picked her up earlier in an old Landcruiser that’s being driven by Sean Arnold, the operator of Animal Tracks Safaris. Sean runs these day tours of Kakadu, but the knowledge is all Patsy’s.

For years, she didn’t want to do this. Patsy would watch from afar, she says, as Sean brought his groups of tourists out into the park, and would cringe while he attempted to explain the bush to them. “We’d see him out here, just makin’ damper,” she laughs.

Patsy, of the Gunavidji people, prepares a magpie goose for dinner. Photo: Ben Groundwater

Eventually, Sean persuaded Patsy to come on board as a guide, to pass on her knowledge of the bush.

“Why did it take so long to convince you?” I ask. “Were you not happy to pass on your stories?”

“Nah,” Patsy answers, “it wasn’t that. I just didn’t want a job, you know?”

Patsy was, and still would be, completely happy to survive off the land. She’s old school. Sean explains before we pick her up that we shouldn’t say hello, because there’s no word for greetings in Gunavidji culture. We shouldn’t ask too many questions, but rather just let her speak when she wants.

And so everyone is a little unsure, as we walk around the waterhole poking in the mud looking for freshwater mussels, of how to react when Patsy mentions that she hunts the smaller crocodiles that now inhabit this area. How do you kill a crocodile? With a club? A spear?

Nah, Patsy smiles. You just shoot it.

Soon we move away from the waterhole, and into the Kakadu bush proper. The idea of this safari is to give visitors a taste of traditional Aboriginal life, both literally and figuratively. This day trip focuses on local food, on the fruits and vegies and grubs you can forage from a seemingly inhospitable land, and the way to cook them to make them taste good.

We spend a good part of the afternoon watching as Patsy digs fat, wriggling grubs out of the base of a termite mound, or pulls bush carrots out of the ground, or finds water chestnuts around a waterhole. She crushes up live green ants and eats them. She stops to pluck the feathers from a magpie goose she killed this morning.

This might sound a little raw, maybe even confronting, but this is where food comes from. This is Patsy’s life.

Eventually, we bring all these ingredients to a clearing by a big mud flat filled with birdlife, where Patsy prepares a ground oven to cook in.

“I had some blokes say to me once, ‘Hey, it’s just like a hangi’,” Patsy recalls, talking about the traditional Maori ground oven. “I said, ‘Brother, we’ve been usin’ these for 10,000 years. You know more about Maoris than you do about your own country.'”

It’s embarrassing to admit that she’s right. Most of us know so little about Aboriginal culture, and this is one of the few ways to learn. On days like today you find out that there’s food where you never would have looked for it. You discover there’s an ancient culture that lives on in people like Patsy.

And you realise that, out here, a shotgun probably comes in handy.

梧桐夜网traveller南京夜网419论坛/kakadu梧桐夜网northernterritory南京夜网梧桐夜网animaltracks南京夜网419论坛FLYQantas flies from all major Australian hubs to Darwin – see qantas南京夜网. Kakadu National Park is a three-and-a-half-hour drive from the airport. For hire cars, seethrifty南京夜网419论坛

STAYCooinda Lodge has accommodation in Kakadu NP ranging from family-style rooms to a campsite and caravan park. Seekakadutourism南京夜网for more.

TOURAnimal Tracks Safaris provides seven-hour 4WD adventure tours of Kakadu National Park, including a traditional bush tucker meal and instruction by an Aboriginal guide, for $220 per adult, $110 per child. See website above.

Ben Groundwater travelled as a guest of Tourism NT

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The Turnbull government is aiming to use the successful passage of its childcare reforms, which redistribute subsidies from wealthy to low-income families, as a springboard to overhaul the way schools are funded.
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The government is examining trimming funding to “over-funded” private schools and redistributing money to needy public and non-government schools as part of the new funding model.

Education Minister Simon Birmingham will shift his attention to schools after the Senate passed the government’s $1.6 billion childcare package on Thursday night.

Fairfax Media understands cabinet has discussed school funding repeatedly over recent months and is close to finalising the government’s position.

The government is expected to sell its policy, which will be less generous than Labor’s, on the grounds it creates fairness between states and school sectors.

Changing indexation rates so schools transition more quickly to their appropriate resourcing standard would require Senate approval.

Around 150 private schools receive excess government funding and it will take decades for some to arrive at their appropriate standard under the current formula.

But a final deal on school funding is likely to be delayed until the middle of the year, leaving little time to implement a new model before it takes effect next year.

Senator Birmingham has consistently said that new four-year funding arrangements would be resolved at an April COAG meeting between the Prime Minister and state and territory leaders.

But the COAG meeting has been delayed until after the May budget and is not expected to take place in June. It is understood the April meeting was cancelled at the request of two state premiers who could not attend.

Senator Birmingham will seek to advance the issue when he meets with his state counterparts on April 7.

The independent and Catholic school sectors had already said they were “increasingly alarmed” at the lack of detail from Canberra and that the uncertainty was disrupting principals’ planning for next year.

Labor schools spokeswoman Tanya Plibersek this week shifted her rhetoric by saying Labor was “very happy to talk about bringing overfunded schools down to a fairer rate of funding more quickly if the Government actually proposes that”.

“There’s no concrete proposal on the table from the Government to reduce funding for overfunded schools,” Ms Plibersek said.

“The only concrete proposal from the Government is to reduce all funding to all schools, right across Australia.”

Ms Plibersek previously said there was no “compelling” case to reduce funding to overfunded private schools as only a small number of schools receive excess funding.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull on Friday said the government had achieved an “outstanding reform” by passing its childcare package.

“It will benefit around a million families,” he said. “It’s targeted to those who work the longest hours but earn the least.”

Childcare groups said they were bitterly disappointed the Senate crossbench did not force the government to raise the minimum subsidised hours of childcare from 12 to 15 hours a week.

“This leaves up to 100,000 children from low-income families without the support they need,” Goodstart Early Learning spokesman John Cherry said.

“While many working families will be better off as a result of the childcare reforms it is disappointing that modest changes which would have protected children from very-low-income families have been ignored.”

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